Enhanced Features and Functions Guide

How to use the Yachting function

Many yacht races are set in triangular course layouts such as the one described on the next page, where the winner is the boat that navigates the designated course around the marks in the fastest time.
Direction: Navigational bearings are most often given in terms of degrees. North: 0° East: 90° South: 180° West: 270°

Starboard is the right hand side of a yacht when looking forwards and is always green, Port is the left hand side of a yacht when looking forwards and is always red.

<Using the rotating bezel to determine Wind Direction>

How to use the watch as a Compass

•Before a race, determine the direction of the wind from the direction and position of the windward mark. Line up the number representing the wind direction (in degrees) on the bezel with the triangle “▲” mark at 12 o’clock.
Ex : northeasterly wind 45°.
•The course bearing from the windward mark to the Wing mark (starboard reach) is read off the bezel, in degrees, at the green triangle “▲” on the bottom left side of the dial.
•The course bearing from the Wing mark to the leeward mark (port reach is read off the bezel, in degrees, at the red “▲” on the bottom right.
•When sailing from the windward mark to the leeward mark, the small, triangle “▲” at the 6 o’clock position on the dial becomes the reference point for determining course bearings.

Note : The above example is only valid for times when the θ angle is 45°. At 60°, use the values lying above the red and green triangles; at 30°, use the values lying below the two triangles.
Using the rotating bezel to determine the favored position on the start line.

How to use the watch as a Compass

Most present-day yachts are capable of sailing at 45° to the wind.
To be in a position of being able to read the Wind Shift at the start of a race, make several runs before the race matching your course as close as possible to the red (or green) bars on the left (or right) upper portion of the watch face.
By using the rotating bezel in the following way you can determine the angle between the start/finish line and the direction from which the wind is blowing.

The start /finish line is set at right angles to the direction of the wind, but because the wind is always shifting direction, it is a rare occasion when a true 90° angle is achieved. In view of this condition, line up the white triangle at the 12 o’clock position on the watch with the direction from which the wind is blowing.
Sail from one end of the start/finish line to the other, using the white lines marked (at 3 or 9 o’clock) on the watch to site your destination.
If the course steered falls on the plus (+) side of the white line, you are on a favorable heading to start the race when you cross the start/finish line.
If the course steered falls to the minus (-) side of the white line on the watch, you know it is favorable to cross the start/finish line on a heading from the opposite direction.